Lemon Juice – The Good, The Bad, & The Sour

Posted on January 13th, 2021

Miami dentist, Dr. Ramon Bana at Miami Sedation and Cosmetic Dentistry explains how lemon juice is both acidic and alkaline and what that means for your teeth.In a great tale of opposites, lemon juice can be both acidic and basic, or alkaline. Read on to find out why people are talking about this, and what it means for your oral and overall health.

What Is pH & Why Does It Matter?

Drinking lemon juice (usually diluted in a glass of water or added to a cup of tea) is a beloved health tonic among fans of natural medicine. Potential benefits include lower cholesterol, lower inflammation in the body, and increased metabolism and energy. Lemon also contains high levels of antioxidants and vitamin C that boost your immune system. 

On a scale of 0-14, a pH of 7 is neutral (pure water) while numbers below 7 are acidic (unhealthy), while numbers above 7 are basic or alkaline (healthy). Believers in holistic health blame many ailments on the body’s pH being too low or too acidic. Increasing your body’s pH is called “alkalizing.”

Lemon juice in its natural state is acidic with a pH of about 2, but once metabolized it actually becomes alkaline with a pH well above 7. So, outside the body, anyone can see that lemon juice is very acidic. However, once fully digested, its effect is proven to be alkalizing with many health benefits. So how does lemon juice or a daily glass of lemon water affect the health of your mouth and teeth?

Acidity & Oral Health

The bottom line here is that any time you encounter lemon juice, it’s likely to be in its acidic state. Lemons contain citric acid, which is corrosive and damaging to tooth enamel. It’s not until the lemon juice has been fully digested and metabolized that it becomes alkaline. So, it’s important to ingest lemon juice sparingly, assuming the acid can and will eventually affect your tooth enamel. 

Signs Tooth Enamel is Damaged:

Discoloration – The white enamel may wear out and look yellow because of exposed dentin. 

Transparency – Clearness in enamel means it’s not as strong.

Sensitivity – Enamel protects the dentin and deeper layers. When enamel is damaged, your teeth will be more sensitive to hot and cold. 

When it comes to deciding between lemon water and plain water, use your best judgment. A glass of lemon juice diluted in water is certainly not as damaging as sucking juice straight from a lemon wedge. (Now, if you added a load of sugar to that lemon water to make lemonade, you have a new and different problem for dental health!) 

If you’d like to make a refreshing glass of lemon water part of your daily routine, give it a try! You may notice some of the many health benefits and alkalizing effects on your overall health. We do suggest you wait at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth so as not to agitate your enamel even more with both the brushing motion and acid present in your mouth. Ingesting lemon juice is not recommended if you have acid indigestion or mouth ulcers.

Always consult with your Miami dentist for more personalized support for all things health and wellness. For more information, or to get a checkup on the current state of your enamel, contact Dr. Ramon Bana at Miami Sedation and Cosmetic Dentistry to make an appointment.

 

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

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About Ramon Bana, DDS

Dr. Bana’s patients describe him as down-to-earth, professional and full of heart. He is talented and strives to make each patient leave the office feeling better than when they arrived. Patient comfort is his top priority, and patients say they feel like extended family. He is dedicated to his practice, patients and team – and it shows. Dr. Bana loves coming to work because his work changes people for the better. Patients leave his care healthier, happier and with brighter smiles.